Lesson Plans

April 14, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • How did your office move go?
  • Do you feel stress?
  • Does Lisa feel stress?

Lake Baikal: The bitter battle over tourism at Russia’s ‘Sacred Sea’

  • “April is the cruelest month” ~ T.S. Eliot
    • Is April the cruelest month?
  • Do certain months have certain feelings for you?
  • Are you happy?
  • How happy are you?
  • Are you surprised by Koreans’ “self-reported happiness”?
  • YouTube Videos Shift to Cooking as Pandemic Drags On
    • Has your coronavirus TV / YouTube viewing changed during the coronavirus?
    • Article: “With the coronavirus pandemic showing no signs of a letup, YouTube videos are shifting from ‘mukbang’ (a portmanteau in Korean of ‘eating’ and ‘broadcast’) to ‘cookbang’ (‘cooking’ and ‘broadcast’).’
      • What does “portmanteau” mean?
        • What does “port” mean?
        • Etymology, word origin (in this context) :
          • Lewis Carroll used “portmanteau”, which was a type of luggage, in “Through the Looking-Glass”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice the coinage of unusual words used in “Jabberwocky”. “Slithy” meant “slimy and lithe” and mimsy meant “miserable and flimsy”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice combining words in various ways: “You see it’s like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.”
    • Do you know any portmanteaus?
      • smog
      • motel
      • brunch
      • Microsoft
      • dramady / sitcom / romcom
      • frenemy
        • (Note: none of the above results in a red squiggly line underneath it.)
    • Portmanteaus vs. compound words
      • watermelon
      • starfish
    • Why are Koreans particularly keen on portmanteaus?
    • What are your favorite portmanteaus?
    • Where is Korea’s list of portmanteaus?
      • French, Hebrew, Spanish, and Japanese have their own Wikipedia sections.
      • Do you want to write our own list for Wikipedia?
        • What words should we include?
    • List of portmanteaus (English)
It’s micro-resolution time again!

April 7, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • No class

March 31, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • How is your office move going?
  • Do you feel stress?
  • Does Lisa feel stress?
  • What are some minor Korean holidays, holidays that are not red days but Koreans have some kinds of customs, traditions, or activities?
  • Are you happy?
  • How happy are you?
  • Are you surprised by Koreans’ “self-reported happiness”?
  • YouTube Videos Shift to Cooking as Pandemic Drags On
    • Has your coronavirus TV / YouTube viewing changed during the coronavirus?
    • Article: “With the coronavirus pandemic showing no signs of a letup, YouTube videos are shifting from ‘mukbang’ (a portmanteau in Korean of ‘eating’ and ‘broadcast’) to ‘cookbang’ (‘cooking’ and ‘broadcast’).’
      • What does “portmanteau” mean?
        • What does “port” mean?
        • Etymology, word origin (in this context) :
          • Lewis Carroll used “portmanteau”, which was a type of luggage, in “Through the Looking-Glass”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice the coinage of unusual words used in “Jabberwocky”. “Slithy” meant “slimy and lithe” and mimsy meant “miserable and flimsy”. Humpty Dumpty explained to Alice combining words in various ways: “You see it’s like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.”
    • Do you know any portmanteaus?
      • smog
      • motel
      • brunch
      • Microsoft
      • dramady / sitcom / romcom
      • frenemy
        • (Note: none of the above results in a red squiggly line underneath it.)
    • Portmanteaus vs. compound words
      • watermelon
      • starfish
    • Why are Koreans particularly keen on portmanteaus?
    • What are your favorite portmanteaus?
    • Where is Korea’s list of portmanteaus?
      • French, Hebrew, Spanish, and Japanese have their own Wikipedia sections.
      • Do you want to write our own list for Wikipedia?
        • What words should we include?
    • List of portmanteaus (English)
It’s micro-resolution time again!
  • FB ad in my feed:

March 24, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • Valor International School
    • Interview
    • AP Economics (micro, macro)
    • Computer coding

March 17, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • My vote for the single most important, consequential, date in history: March 15, 44 B.C.
    • “Beware the Ides of March” (Shakespeare – Julius Caesar, Act I, scene ii)
      • Caesar: “The Ides of March are come.”
      • Soothsayer: “Aye, Caesar; but not gone.”
      • Who’s Lepidus?
        • “We have crossed the Rubicon”
        • History’s lesson: Saying ‘no’ to a man with an Army is difficult
  • Review:
    • Learning platforms
      • Shakespeare – The standard high school four:
        • Romeo & Juliet
        • Julius Caesar
        • Macbeth
        • Hamlet / King Lear
      • Now out of copyright:
        • The Great Gatsby
    • Adapting to coronavirus and business opportunities
      • Online learning
      • Big boxes (movie theaters, stadiums) renting out spaces
    • Certifications / Opportunities
  • Discussion
    • National Napping Day: 5 reasons you should nap, if you don’t have ‘coronasomnia’
      • Do you still take naps?
        • Do you still take a nap?
        • Do you still nap?
      • Changing the clocks – EST (Eastern Standard Time) to EDT (Eastern Daylight Time)
    • Why Young Married Koreans Pretend to Be Singles
    • More Koreans Marry Foreigners
      • “In the past, many young men from rural areas saw no option but to find themselves mail-order brides because no Korean women would have them. But currently the increase seems to be due to Koreans of either sex getting married to foreigners they meet while studying or working abroad, which suggests that the trend has shifted to educated urban people.”
      • Are you surprised?
      • Do you think that Koreans will be more accepting of mixed couples?
    • Korean Husbands with Non-Korean Wives More Supportive in Child Rearing and Homemaking: Study
      • Are you surprised?
      • How much housework do you do?
    • Half of Koreans Have College or Higher Degrees
      • “The proportion was barely more than 10 percent as recently as the 1990s. But it started to increase as more colleges and universities opened with eased restrictions in 1995, rising to 23.8 percent in 2000 and more than doubling to 50 percent in 2019.”
      • Where do you think Korea ranks?
      • Are you surprised?
    • Stray Kids’ member admits to bullying and takes hiatus
      • “The statement comes after a netizen claimed she was the victim of abusive remarks made by Hyunjin and his male friends in a chatroom when they were in middle school.”
      • Is losing one’s job for middle school incidents too much?
    • Universities Face Dwindling Student Population
      • “For the first time in school history, Chonnam National University was only able to enroll 4,067 new students, leaving 140 slots unfilled.”

March 10, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • Review:
    • Learning platforms
    • Adapting to coronavirus and business opportunities
      • Online learning
      • Big boxes (movie theaters, stadiums) renting out spaces
        • Gamers
        • Lecturers
  • Certifications / Opportunities
    • Do you or Lisa have any English certifications?
    • Here’s a FB ad that I saw:
      • TEFL / TESOL Certification:
        • You Can Now Gain Your TEFL Certificate for Free by just paying the certificate fee. The course typically costs $199 but you can join today for just $27. Become a Certified TEFL Teacher After Just Two Weeks Online Training! The “Teaching English as a Foreign Language” industry has become one of the leading online sectors in 2020. With more vacant positions than teachers to fill them, the time has never been better for you to gain your TEFL certificate.
        • This course typically costs $199, but you can access it today for FREE.
        • What’s the catch? You have to pay the $27 certification fee, and you get full access to the certificate course.
        • Here’s what you get:* Internationally Recognized TEFL Course
        • * 120 Hour TEFL/TESOL certificate
        • * Lifetime Job Club Access
        • * Online Personal TutorThe offer closes shortly.
        • Click here to get started now! https://kartra.internationaltefl.org/tefl-online-2021
    • What’s their business model?
    • Who are the competition?
  • Another “untapped” market:
  • What is a sentence?
    • A sentence has three necessary “ingredients”:
      1. _____.
      2. _____.
      3. _____.
  • Independent clauses
  • Dependent clauses
  • Discussion
    • (Coronavirus business disruptions) More Koreans Move into Hotels as Prices Plummet
      • Would you ever consider living in a hotel?
      • What do you think will happen to housing prices in Seoul and Korea?

March 3, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • Thank you.
  • Review:
    • Comparisons with “as” and “than”
      • What’s the rule?
      • What is the “ambiguous” case?
      • Transitive vs intransitive verbs
  • New learning platform (FB private group link):
    • Greetings EDIK’s! I also posted this in EDIK Jobs, so let me know if this is appropriate. A new online language learning platform teaching 1-on-1 video Zoom classes is seeking native language speaking teachers for English, Hangul, and Mandarin languages. You can set your own working hours and your own hourly pay rate and the platform takes a 15% commission on all classes taught. You only need to have a college degree, teaching experience, be a native speaker, and have a Zoom Pro account license. Please PM me on how (you or your wife) can apply or to request more information. Please feel free to share this opportunity with qualified teachers.
    • Adapting to coronavirus
      • Online learning
      • Big boxes (movie theaters, stadiums) renting out spaces
        • Gamers
        • Lecturers
  • What is a sentence?
    • A sentence has three necessary “ingredients”:
      1. _____.
      2. _____.
      3. _____.
  • Independent clauses
  • Dependent clauses

February 24, 2021 (Wednesday)

Thank you
  • Comparisons with as and than
    • spoken English and formal written English
    • transitive and intransitive verbs
      • transitive verbs take an object (trans means across)
      • intransitive verbs don’t take an object (in means not)
      • some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive, depending on context.
    • “Does mommy love chocolate more than me?”
      • Compare:
        1. She runs 10k races faster than me.
        2. He loves her more than me.
      • Compare:
        1. She runs 10k races as fast as me.
        2. He loves her as much as me.
        3. Daddy loves baby as much as mommy.
  • When You Trap a Tiger, a Newbery Award, “the Noble prize of children’s literature”, winner.
    • by Tae Keller was a child author and daughter of Nora Okja Keller.
    • “…the story of Lily and her relationship with her aging and ill Korean grandmother, wrapped around the Korean folktales her grandmother tells her at bedtime.”
    • Have you heard of this book, When You Trap a Tiger?
    • Which Korean folktales do you know?
      • Do you tell your children?
      • Why do we tell our children of such folktales?
        • Culture
          • Which stories and folk tales are most important in and to Korean culture?
        • Cultural literacy
          • What is cultural literacy?
          • Are you culturally literate?
          • Are your children / family culturally literate?
          • What should Koreans know to be culturally literate?
        • Moral teaching
          • What stories are part of Korean moral teaching?
          • American children’s stories:
            • The Little Engine That Could
            • Aesop’s Fables
              • The Ant and the Grasshopper
              • The Boy Who Cried Wolf
              • (What are the moral lessons?)
            • Rip Van Winkel

February 17, 2021 (Wednesday)

New Year’s Celebrations
  • Did you have a happy Seollal?
  • Did you do anything special?
  • What do you think that you will do next year, post coronavirus?
    • What does post mean?
  • Twin Volleyball Stars Sacked for Bullying
    • How big of a problem is bullying in Korea?
    • Have you ever bullied anyone?
    • Have you ever been bullied?
    • “The twin sisters were accused of violence last week by a woman claiming to be a former middle-school teammate. The accuser listed some 21 allegations including habitual physical assault, threatening with a knife and stealing money, saying “I tried to forget it because it happened 10 years ago, but the twins seem to be ignoring their past.”
      • Should the twin sisters have been sacked from their jobs for a middle school incident?
      • “The twins quickly admitted “irresponsible behavior in the past” and apologized to the victim, but were unable to stop the avalanche of public anger and disappointment.”
        • Is “sorry” enough?
  • Apps
    • Which do you use?
    • What are the apps you most recommend?

Gongdo Middle School (First Grade) Text

February 10, 2021 (Wednesday)

New Year’s Celebrations
  • Do Koreans do something special for Seollal, lunar new year?
  • Do you or your family have special or different observations, way of celebrating or “observing”, the lunar new year?
  • What do you do for solar new year, New Year’s Day?
  • Speaking test question:
    • Tell me about an important holiday in your country
    • How is the way people celebrate the holiday today different from the way they celebrated in the past?

Gongdo Middle School (First Grade) Text

February 3, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • Pandemic opportunities
    • Switch to online teaching
    • advantages and disadvantages
      • Advantages
        • scalability – to scale
      • Disadvantages
        • infrastructure
        • current business model
    • (Audio) Recorded books
    • (Video) Recorded lessons
    • Live group (Zoom) lessons
    • Live one-to-one (20-minute) lessons
    • Topic classes
      • Debate class
      • Chess class
      • Math (?) class

January 27, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • Weekend plans
    • Do you ski?
    • Where have you been?
    • Where do you go?
    • What do you recommend?
      • idiom – “do’s and don’ts” (note the strange spelling)
      • Skiing do’s –
      • Skiing don’ts –
  • Making a WordPress Website
    • How is Lisa doing?
    • What do you want to do with your website?

January 20, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • Favorite historical fiction books and non-fiction books and documentaries
    • Your recommendations please for great non-fiction or historical fiction for the long dark pandemic winter.
    • Yale alumni group post
Making a WordPress Website

January 13, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • HOMEWORK:
MonthRayLisaJoseph
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
  • I have 12 micro-resolutions. How many did you make?
    • Joseph’s plans / ideas / possibilities for micro-resolutions:
      1. Obey all traffic laws
      2. Study / learn Korean for 10 mins per day
      3. Make one teaching lesson plan per day.
      4. Live an 80 / 20 life
        • Realize that I get 80% of benefits from 20% of resources, which means time, effort, cost, etc.
          • Limit myself to 1 hour TV to force myself to only view the best
          • Limit Social media (Facebook) to 30 minutes total per day
          • Read non-fiction 80 / 20
          • __________
          • __________
      5. Train with my son Joey for a 10K road race with the goal of finishing in under 1 hour
      6. Play / practice / learn chess for 10 minutes per day
      7. Write a book, “10 Minutes”, about my 10-minute life.
      8. NO TV
      9. Start my TESOL Certification course on Coursera and work on it for 1 hour per day. (I should be able to finish 2 or 3 and maybe 4 of the eight classes if I work at that pace.)
        • Are you or Lisa interested in TESOL , CELTA, DELTA, or TEFL certification?
        • …maybe do TESOL Certification in the same month as NO TV month?
      10. Contact one friend, colleague, former client, etc. per day and take a genuine interest in what they’ve been up to just because (“for no better reason than to”) reestablish our relationship.
      11. Spend 30 minutes per day making business contacts, sending resumes, applying for jobs.
      12. Read four books by using the post-it flag method
  • How to read a book a week:
Making a WordPress Website

January 6, 2021 (Wednesday)

  • What did you do for New Years Eve?
  • What did you do for New Years Day?
    • Past Tense
    • celebrate -> celebrated
    • (세상에 알리다)
    • We celebrated New Year’s Eve. I….
    • 우리는 새해 전날을 축하했습니다.give – > gave
    • get – > got
    • go -> went
    • drink -> drank
    • eat -> ate
  • What have you done since September?
    • What verb tense is “have you done” in?
    • What verb tense do you answer in?
  • Why is January called “January”?

Janus, the god for whom January is named, was an important god in the Roman pantheon (pan +theos). Janus was the Roman “god of doors”, and nearly all Roman households had an altar to Janus.

What? A god of doors?

…and Endings. Every ending is a beginning, and every beginning is an ending.

Janus is often depicted (de+pict+ed) as a two-faced god with the younger boyish face looking forward to the future and the older bearded face looking back at the past.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s